How To Clean Aluminium Windows?

Shaped Windows

Metal windows have been a feature in homes for decades. Today, aluminium windows are becoming even more popular option. 

With a long-life span and high-level security, many people are opting for an aluminium frame for their windows. Like all windows though, they need the occasional clean to stay looking their best. 

But how do you exactly clean an aluminium window?

Not to worry, our team has comprised a step-by-step guide to walk  you through the process.

Step 1) 

The first thing you want to do is mix a mild detergent with warm water in a bucket. 

Step 2) 

With a sponge or non-abrasive cloth, you will want to gently scrub the aluminium frame, without applying too much pressure. 

Avoid blemishing the glass whilst scrubbing.

Step 3)

Avoid using an abrasive cloth, for tough stains use an ink rubber cloth.  

Step 4) 

Using a soft cloth, dry the aluminium frame. 

Tip: You should avoid being too aggressive when scrubbing stains as this can affect the powder coating of your aluminium frame. 

How to remove oxidation from aluminium windows?

Oxidation prevents aluminium from further corrosion but when it comes to your window’s aesthetics, it’s not a good look.

Oxidation is more difficult to get rid of than general stains but with citrus cleaner, you can remove it from your windows. 

Here’s how:

Citrus cleaner 

Step 1)

Using a nylon scrub brush, you want to begin with brushing away any dirt on the window frame. 

Step 2) 

Next, you will want to wet the entire frame with clean water. 

Step 3) 

Spray the citrus cleaner onto the nylon scrub brush. 

Step 4) 

You want to scrub the frame until the oxidation has been fully removed. 

Step 5) 

Once all the oxidation is no longer visible, rinse the aluminium frame with clean water and then dry using a soft and absorbent cloth. 

 

Now you know how to clean your aluminium windows, it’s important that you give them an occasional clean to maintain them and to keep their shine. 

Despite their impressive longevity, if aluminium windows are neglected, like all windows, the damage could be irreversible and a replacement window is needed. 

When looking for a new or replacement aluminium window, you should choose a trusted supplier. 

At Heritage Home Improvements, all our products are designed to the highest specifications and made to last. 

We deliver a quality service, supplying quality products. 

If you’re looking for a new or replacement aluminium window in Wolverhampton or Shropshire, we should be your first point of call.

Get in touch today 

 

Best Windows For Period Homes

Shaped Windows

Houses have really changed over the years. From Tudor to Georgian, all the way to modern, contemporary ones.

However, period homes offer a character and charm that is hard to replicate in modern homes.

Whether it’s a Georgian cottage or a traditional Tudor home, your home can start showing the signs of  wear over time and that includes the windows. 

If you are a lucky owner of a beautiful, classic style home, the choice of replacement windows must be carefully considered.

It’s important to choose windows that match the aesthetic of your home so they don’t look mismatched and odd. 

But which window style is right for your period home? 

Our team has compiled a list of window styles perfect for period homes. 

Window styles for period homes

 

 Flush sash windows

 

Flush sash windows were popular in Victorian times and today they are still  a common choice for period and traditional homes. 

Flush sash windows feature a classic  appearance and traditional timber sightlines, that give  a polished  and elegant appearance,  perfectly matching period homes. 

Available in a range of timber-effect colour options, modern flush sash windows could easily be mistaken for a traditional styled timber window. 

 

 

  • Casement windows with astragal bars

 

Casement windows have been a popular choice  for decades and they are still a modern day favourite. 

They  can be designed to be a perfect match to  period homes.

Casement windows can be fitted with astragal bars that divide the glass pane areas, giving a traditional look that replicates the iconic Georgian window style. 

 

  • Sliding sash windows

 

The sliding window has been a feature in homes for hundreds of years. 

Sliding sash windows are built with a sliding mechanism which slides open as opposed to swinging open that gives a classic home aesthetic..

The sliding sash window is a perfect match for traditional styled and period homes. 

 

Find the right window for your period home 

 

Whether it’s a modern  or a traditional styled window, it’s crucial that you choose an installer you can trust. 

At Heritage Home Improvements, we are focused on delivering a first class service and  supplying the finest products. 

With a huge range of window styles in an array of colour options available, we have the right window for your property. 

For more information and advice on finding the right window for your period home, get in touch today. 

Difference Between Conservatory And Orangery

Victorian Conservatory

There’s really nothing better than a new conservatory.

A conservatory helps to create extra space in your home and can be used for a wide range of purposes from entertaining friends, to giving the children somewhere to play. It also gives you somewhere to relax and enjoy your garden, whatever the weather is doing. 

There are many different styles of conservatories to choose from, but there’s one in particular that keeps cropping up and which still has many people confused: ‘Orangery’. 

So, what exactly is an orangery and how is it different from a conservatory? This article should help you understand a bit more about the difference between conservatory and orangery and decide which is the right option for your home. 

What Is An Orangery? 

Orangeries first emerged in the stately homes of the 18th century. As explorers travelled further around the globe, they brought back with them tropical plants. These were then purchased by the wealthy, and housed within an orangery as a status symbol. There are many examples of traditional orangeries still in use today at stately homes around the country. 

Modern Day Orangeries

Fast forward a few hundred years and the orangeries of today are slightly different to the original structures. For one thing, they are a lot smaller, though, in many cases, no less grand. A modern orangery is a glass structure, designed in the style of a traditional orangery and usually attached to the home to create an additional indoor space within the garden. 

What Is The Difference Between Conservatory And Orangery?

The above description could easily be used to describe a conservatory. After all, both an orangery and a conservatory can be used to create additional space in the home, and both are constructed largely of glass. However, there are a number of key distinctions between the two. 

An orangery tends to be constructed using more robust pillars between the glass. These will usually be timber or brick and create a more solid feel to the structure.

An orangery would also have a flat roof, possibly with a central lantern, whereas conservatories tend to have pitched and gable roofs. 

Should You Choose An Orangery Or A Conservatory? 

Ultimately, the choice between an orangery or a conservatory comes down to its intended purpose.

Because it has a flat roof and more brick or timberwork, an orangery will feel a lot more solid than a conservatory, making it an ideal choice for those wishing to extend their property with more of an indoor space.

Although a conservatory can also be built with a brick base or wider timber or brick pillars, it would generally have more glass, making it a better choice for those who wish to use their conservatory as more of an outdoor space. 

And of course, personal preference goes a long way in making this decision. So why not take a look at our range of conservatories and orangeries.

If your home is in Kent or surrounding areas, request a price from us for your new conservatory or orangery.

Can Double Glazing Help Save Money On Heating Bills?

Double Glazing March Offer

Depending on whether you currently have double glazing or single glazing, reducing your monthly energy costs may always be tricky.

And while this is an article tailored more towards how double glazing can save you money each month compared to single glazed windows, we do include a few cost-cutting tips, so keep reading to find out what they are.

But in most cases, yes, double glazing can help you save money on your heating bills and here’s why.

Improved Energy Efficiency

Once you install double glazing into your home you will experience much greater heat retention throughout the property.

This is because, with double glazing, hot air really has nowhere to escape unless you open a window.

Whereby single glazing allows for draughts and with the single window pane, coming into direct contact with hot on from the inside, cools down the home and therefore heat is lost.

By improving your energy efficiency through double glazing, you’re already reducing your energy costs on a monthly basis by quite a lot.

Durability and Sustainability

Have you ever felt a single glazed window before? They seem to be very unsafe and easy to break, even without much effort!

If you have single glazed windows then you’ll know that it doesn’t take much for them to shatter. Weather storms, burglars and more can easily break the glass and you may spend more time replacing the glass than actually saving money.

That’s why you should see double glazing as a good investment. 

The glass is tougher and more durable to keep unwanted intruders away. Furthermore, the solid glass panels mean that they’re a lot more sustainable than the single glazed counterparts.

All this adds up to be that not only through energy efficiency will you be saving money on energy costs, but through durability and sustainability your new double glazed windows may last for up to 25 years if taken care of and treated well.

So whilst it may seem a heavy cost upfront in buying your double glazed windows and installing them, over time, you will get your money back through the savings you’ll make on a month-to-month basis.

Tips To Keep Costs Down

Here are some additions tips you can do for relatively cheap to help keep costs down each month.

Keep Internal Doors Closed

If you have a habit of leaving your bathroom door, bedroom door, living room door or even kitchen door open heat has much further to travel throughout the property.

By keeping internal doors closed, you reduce the distance heat has to travel to warm up the rooms.

If you have a radiator in each room, keeping the door closed will help the room heat up much quicker than if you were to leave them open.

So be sure to shut your doors! It might end up saving you a bit of money.

Don’t Leave Heating On All Day

It doesn’t make sense to leave the heating on all day, especially if you’re not in the house all day.

Consider putting your heating on a timer so that you know at certain times of the day, when you’re at home, the heating will come on and warm the house up.

Whilst it may be a nice feeling coming home to a warm house, it’s not only a waste of heating bills it’s also a waste of electricity. 

So consider a timer to come on 30 minutes before you get home, so that when you do get home, the heating will have been on in a short time, but long enough to warm your house.

Natural Light

When the weather is relatively warm and the sun is shining, open up your curtains or blinds to allow the house to heat up naturally via sunlight.

If you open the windows, the hot air will escape and you may be left with a cold house. 

So rather than going to put the heating on once you’ve closed the windows, keep them closed and let the sun heat your house for free.

Invest In Double Glazing

If your home in Kent doesn’t have double glazing fitted, don’t worry. Speak to us today about how we can help make your home more energy efficient

How to choose a double glazing company

Choose a double glazing company

This week we have a guest post for you. We feel this article gives some really great advice on how to find a double glazing company that you can trust with your home. Please read on and if you have any questions regarding any of Extra  memberships or accreditations, please get in touch.

What are Fascias, Soffits & Guttering?

FSG

One of the questions we hear so often is “What are Fascias, Soffits & Guttering?”. We help homeowners all over Kent, Essex and London with our range of Roofline products. Our high quality, durable range of Fascias, Soffits & Guttering are a great improvement on traditional products, giving a much-improved appearance and low maintenance addition to your home. But for many people, each of these different products is a bit of a mystery.

Condensation on Windows

Condensation

One of the main gripes UK homeowners have during the cold winter months is the build of condensation on their windows. This can be a real annoyance and, in some cases, can even cause actual damage to the home. Condensation on the inside of your windows is caused by an excessive amount of moisture inside your home. This is more common in winter as any houses will generally have their windows closed to keep their homes nice and warm, trapping any airborne moisture inside. When the warm air inside the home meets the cold windows condensation is formed.

Front Door Designer

Front Door Designer

Your front door can make a HUGE difference to the appearance of your home.  With so many different styles and colours to choose from, you can tailor design the perfect door to give your home a look that suits your personality perfectly.  But with so many choices to make how do you know what the best front door for you is.

What is a WarmRoof?

Warm Roof

One of our most popular products here at Extra is the WarmRoof. This is a stunning addition to any home, whether you already have a conservatory or are planning to build a new one. But many people are still asking us the question ‘What is a WarmRoof?’.

Big change for extension planning permission in 2019

Planning permission changes

After building quality conservatories, orangeries and extensions for years you start to become accustomed to the methods and processes needed to extend homes here in the UK in 2019. Depending on the size of the conservatory (and the type of house) in some cases extension planning permission was needed before construction could begin. This could be a real pain, with timescales and budget suffering whilst the homeowner waits for their permission to be granted. Luckily, back in 2014 the the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) trialed a “lighter” version of the previously strict rules to make it easier for home owners to extend their homes.